So you seeding your lawn

Now what? Creating a healthy lawn requires many favorable conditions to be just right. Some of those conditions to consider as you seed or have your lawn overseeded are:


1) Moisture

2) Oxygen

2) Sunlight

3) Nutrients

4) Compaction

5) pH Levels

6) Competition

7) Traffic


In the list above, some of the items are "no-brainers" and pretty self explanitory. Others, well, we'll touch on in this article. For instance, most of understand that anything living needs some form of water, oxygen/carbon dioxide, and sun. The same is true for grass seed. But maybe things like compaction, pH levels are not as commonly discussed.


Compaction is necessary when building retaining walls, paver patios, or laying concrete for a driveway. But when it comes to growing turf, a lighter looser soil will be more conducive to receiving nutrients and allowing them to flow throughout the root zone of a lawn. Aerating is one way to reduce compaction that naturally occurs from using a riding lawn mower or in areas where soil is more dense. Another way to soften or "break-up" dense soils is by applying gypsum. This soil amendment works to improve how much moisture the soil can hold. By holding more moisture, the soil has a improvement in retaining nutrients.


Similar, but still different than compaction is traffic. Foot traffic and pet traffic can really wear out a good piece of turf. Surely you can picture a drive way edge that has been beat up, or a run along a fenceline that Fido has created. If you're reseeding or installing sod to repair an area, we can't stress how important it is to have a plan to protect those areas during the germination and early root development stages.


Soil pH has to do with the alkaline and acidity ratios. Essentially, this scale helps to identify the sweet spot to grow grass. For Fescue, that sweet spot is a pH of 5.6-6.5. The way these figures are identified is through completion of a soil test. Most tests indicate that lime is needed to help balance out the pH level. Delivering lime into a crop is a slow process and likely will require multiple seasons of distributing lime.


We hope this article helps you in your pursuit to develop a beautiful yard for your



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